This page is still loading

Photos

Click on the headings below to see more photo pages.


Photo Page

close
Close Window

Brussels and Brugge

Location: Brussels and Brugge, Belgium

A short exciting trip to Brussels and Brugge, to try as many beers as we could (22 in 2 days), taste decadent chocolate and take in the history of this amazing place.

Parc de Bruxelles is the largest urban public park in the center of Brussels. It is surrounded by the Royal Palace of Brussels, the Belgian parliament and the U.S.A. embassy.

Parc du Cinquantenaire (French for "Park of the Fiftieth Anniversary", is a large public, urban park (30 hectares) in the easternmost part of the European Quarter in Brussels, Belgium. Most buildings of the U-shaped complex which dominate the park were commissioned by King Leopold II and built for the 1880 National Exhibition commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of Belgian independence. The centrepiece triumphal arch was erected in 1905. The structures were built in iron, glass and stone, symbolising the economic and industrial performance of Belgium. The surrounding 30 hectare park esplanade was full of picturesque gardens, ponds and waterfalls. It housed several trade fairs, exhibitions and festivals at the beginning of the century. This settled however in 1930 when it was decided that Cinquantenaire would become a leisure park.

The pee pee boy or otherwise known as Mannekin Pis. Records indicate the original Mannekin Pis was created in 1388. It was destroyed many centuries later. By popular demand, the City of Brussels commissioned Jerome Duquesnoy to build another in 1619. This statue is alive and well today, situated in the labyrinth of little shops that surround The Grand Place in Brussels, Begium. As a bonus he "pees" beer on the days that his costume is changed. Most the time, however, he is as nature intended him to be. He has been dressed as Elvis, a samurai warrior, in full hockey gear, as Mozart and as a Shriner — to name a few. Many of his costumes were donated by government officials and such celebrities as Elizabeth Taylor. His first costume was donated by King Louis XV of France in 1747. Legend and mystery surrounds the origins of the Mannekin Pis. Nobody knows why he was created but there are many stories. One such story (with many variations) places the "Wee Boy" as the savior of the city, drowning out the flames of a deadly fire with his wee-wee. Another variation is that he, with precise aim, extinguished the fuse that would have caused a devastating explosion. Another story has our fellow as a street urchin who was unwise enough to relieve himself on the doorway of an evil sorcerer who then condemned him to that position and to pee for eternity. Another that the boy was the son of a wealthy aristocrat who was missing and feared kidnapped. The father, so relieved to find the boy unharmed, had the statue commissioned in honor of the way he was found — peeing against a tree. The Mannekin Pis has been stolen seven times during his long life on display and recovered each time. One man, Antoine Lucas, was sentenced to 20 years in prison when, in 1817, he ripped the statue from its base and fled with it.

The Grand Place & Hôtel de Ville by night Described by Victor Hugo as "the most beautiful square in Europe," the Grand Place is located in the very heart of Brussels. The square contains numerous impressive baroque and gothic buildings, many of which have dazzling gilt details. The Hôtel de Ville (town hall), a gothic masterpiece dating from the early 15th century, is also located in the square.

A musician busking on the cobbled streets of Brugge.



Close Window

Parc du Cinquantenaire (French for "Park of the Fiftieth Anniversary", is a large public, urban park (30 hectares) in the easternmost part of the European Quarter in Brussels, Belgium. Most buildings of the U-shaped complex which dominate the park were commissioned by King Leopold II and built for the 1880 National Exhibition commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of Belgian independence. The centrepiece triumphal arch was erected in 1905. The structures were built in iron, glass and stone, symbolising the economic and industrial performance of Belgium. The surrounding 30 hectare park esplanade was full of picturesque gardens, ponds and waterfalls. It housed several trade fairs, exhibitions and festivals at the beginning of the century. This settled however in 1930 when it was decided that Cinquantenaire would become a leisure park.

Close Window

Parc de Bruxelles is the largest urban public park in the center of Brussels. It is surrounded by the Royal Palace of Brussels, the Belgian parliament and the U.S.A. embassy.

Close Window

Close Window

Close Window

Close Window

Close Window

The pee pee boy or otherwise known as Mannekin Pis. Records indicate the original Mannekin Pis was created in 1388. It was destroyed many centuries later. By popular demand, the City of Brussels commissioned Jerome Duquesnoy to build another in 1619. This statue is alive and well today, situated in the labyrinth of little shops that surround The Grand Place in Brussels, Begium. As a bonus he "pees" beer on the days that his costume is changed. Most the time, however, he is as nature intended him to be. He has been dressed as Elvis, a samurai warrior, in full hockey gear, as Mozart and as a Shriner — to name a few. Many of his costumes were donated by government officials and such celebrities as Elizabeth Taylor. His first costume was donated by King Louis XV of France in 1747. Legend and mystery surrounds the origins of the Mannekin Pis. Nobody knows why he was created but there are many stories. One such story (with many variations) places the "Wee Boy" as the savior of the city, drowning out the flames of a deadly fire with his wee-wee. Another variation is that he, with precise aim, extinguished the fuse that would have caused a devastating explosion. Another story has our fellow as a street urchin who was unwise enough to relieve himself on the doorway of an evil sorcerer who then condemned him to that position and to pee for eternity. Another that the boy was the son of a wealthy aristocrat who was missing and feared kidnapped. The father, so relieved to find the boy unharmed, had the statue commissioned in honor of the way he was found — peeing against a tree. The Mannekin Pis has been stolen seven times during his long life on display and recovered each time. One man, Antoine Lucas, was sentenced to 20 years in prison when, in 1817, he ripped the statue from its base and fled with it.

Close Window

Close Window

A musician busking on the cobbled streets of Brugge.

Close Window

The Grand Place & Hôtel de Ville by night Described by Victor Hugo as "the most beautiful square in Europe," the Grand Place is located in the very heart of Brussels. The square contains numerous impressive baroque and gothic buildings, many of which have dazzling gilt details. The Hôtel de Ville (town hall), a gothic masterpiece dating from the early 15th century, is also located in the square.

Close Window

Close Window